Skip to content

Tyres made specifically for Moultons

23/06/2012

This is a list of wired-on (clincher) tyres produced specifically for Moulton-brand bicycles. All except the recent Schwalbe 17-inch tyres were commissioned by Alex Moulton or Raleigh. Many other tyres have been made that will fit certain rim types used on Moultons but they are not included here.

37-298

    • 14 x 1 3/8″ (37-298) Dunlop, based on the Dunlop Sprite touring tyre. Used for 7/8th scale (Mini series) Moultons

37-349

  • 16 x 1 3/8″ (37-349) Dunlop, based on the Dunlop Sprite touring tyre, with amber walls. Used on early full-size F-frame Moultons, apart from racing versions.
  • 16 x 1 3/8″ (37-349) Dunlop, based on the Dunlop Sprite touring tyre, plain walls, no dynamo track. Used on full-size utility F-frame Moultons and standard Safari.
  • 16 x 1 3/8″ (37-349) Dunlop, based on the Dunlop Sprite touring tyre, plain walls, with dynamo track. Used on full-size utility F-frame Moultons and standard Safari.
  • 16 x 1 3/8″ (37-349) Dunlop, based on the Dunlop Sprite touring tyre but with slightly modified tread and Nylon cording, plain walls, no dynamo track. Used on later full-size utility F-frame Moultons and standard Safari.
  • 16 x 1 3/8″ (37-349) Raleigh SW, copy of the above but apparently slightly heavier and with dynamo track. Believed to be made in Poland for Moulton MkIII, marked 55 psi, 3.8 atm.

32-369

  • 16 x 1 ¼” (32-369) Dunlop, with silver walls. Very rare and the earliest example of Moulton’s specially-developed HP tyre. Apart from the silver walls (reportedly abandoned when the ‘silver’ was found to be explosive), the appearance resembles a finer version of the Dunlop Sprite. The rim for this tyre was designed with the same braking flange diameter as the 18″ (or in Moulton/Dunlop terms, 16″) sprint rim for the tubular tyres (sew-ups) hitherto used on racing Moultons. The idea was that users could easily switch between HPs and the much less durable tubs.
  • 16 x 1 ¼” (32-369) Dunlop, with amber walls. Early and short-lived successor to the above specially-developed HP tyre. Used on early S-range and Speedsix.
  • 16 x 1 ¼” (32-369) Dunlop, with plain walls. Commonest 1960s version of the Moulton HP tyre. Used on S-range and Speedsix.
  • 17 x 1 ¼” (32-369) Wolber, introduced to replace the Dunlop 16 x 1 ¼” for the AM series in the early 1980s, marked 70 psi, 4.6 atm.
  • 17 x 1 ¼” (32-369) Wolber C3 slick, introduced in 1989 for the AM SPEED, designed to run at 140 psi, 9.5 atm.
  • 17 x 1 ¼” (32-369) Bridgestone, introduced September 2000 to replace the standard Wolber 17″. New tread pattern, revised carcase design and marked 700 kPa, 7.0 kgf/sq.cm, 100 psi.
  • 17 x 1 ¼” (32-369) Continental, introduced March 2001 as high performance replacement for the standard Wolber 17″. Same tread pattern as Wolber, revised carcase design with 60 threads per inch 3-ply casing and black skin side-walls. 120 psi.
  • 17 x 1 ¼” (32-369) Schwalbe Dual Compound Stelvio, introduced in UK early 2004 at Schwalbe’s own initiative. Marked Min. 6.0 Bar (85 psi), Max. 8.0 Bar (115 psi).
  • 17 x 1 ¼” (32-369) IRC Super Slick, replacement for the Wolber C3.
  • 17 x 1 ¼” (32-369) Schwalbe Kojak foldable slick.
Advertisements

From → Small-wheelers

3 Comments
  1. kalnin permalink

    hello guys thanks for the list!,
    is there an comprehensive list of where to purchase 32-369…in a costeffective manner
    daniel

    • Hi Daniel,
      I’m the only guy here, as this is a private site, not run by a club or company. Best to Google for current tyres and you could do worse than email the Moulton Bicycle Company, as they make the bikes that use the tyres. For what it’s worth, I recently bought two folding 369 Schwalbe Kojak tyres from SJS (St John Street Cycles) via the web. Like you, I’m always after the best price and they had the best offer I could find on the day. Several other online suppliers also had the tyres.
      Tony

  2. hi i almost forget how many bike tyre sizes there were very comprehensive post eric roberts http://www.pellonautocentre.com/blog/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: